Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall: Klara Ungar, symbol of the defeat of Hungarian liberal dissidents

Thirty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall: Klara Ungar, symbol of the defeat of Hungarian liberal dissidents

Four hours of discussions are necessary for him to sum up his thirty years of fall. To go from this year 1990 when Le Monde was enthusiastic for the “& nbsp; 32 & nbsp; radiant years & nbsp;” of this candidate for mayor of Budapest, symbol of “& nbsp; the progressive and peaceful revolution & nbsp;”, to this autumn 2019 where we find Klara Ungar in offices loaned by the association of one of her friends. At 61 & nbsp; today, this woman with a deep voice weighs little, or almost nothing, in Hungarian political life. With his liberal ideas, the one who participated in 1988 in the birth of Fidesz, the party of Viktor Orban, chained electoral failures. To the point of leaving politics in & nbsp; 2014, when the Hungarian Prime Minister, who has meanwhile become the herald of the European far right, was re-elected for the third time.

"& Nbsp; There are too many winds against me & nbsp;", blows the former deputy who is now devoted to the management of apartments rented on Airbnb. What they seem outdated, these black and white photos which show her smiling alongside the young Orban on the benches of the first democratically elected Parliament, in March & nbsp; 1990 & nbsp ;! An economist, Klara Ungar joined in 1988 a group of law students, Alliance of Young Democrats (Fiatal Demokratak Szövetsege, Fidesz), who wanted to bring down a regime already showing signs of fragility. "& Nbsp; He was the only one to explicitly claim to be pro-European, pro-NATO and want real capitalism & nbsp;", she recalls. A pure and hard liberalism, both economic and cultural.

At the time, Viktor Orban, 25, who came from a small provincial village to do his law in Budapest, established himself as the natural leader of an organization that banned memberships from those over 35. "& Nbsp; I was 30 & nbsp; years old, I was already considered old & nbsp;", recalls the one who still admits "& nbsp; to have been seduced" by this beautiful brown who demanded the departure of the Soviet tanks from Hungary. She then joined a small team responsible for the economic program of the future party. Orban attends one of their meeting. "& Nbsp; It was the first time I met him personally," she says. He was open and curious, he wanted to learn & nbsp; », far from his current violent speeches against the opposition, the migrants and especially George Soros, this Jewish philanthropist of Hungarian origin who nevertheless financed his year of studies spent in Oxford (United Kingdom -United).

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